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Home Cash Flow Solution

DescriptionEdit

HomeCashFlowSolutions main spammedsite

A typical spammed site for Home Cash Flow Solution

Home Cash Flow Solutions or Online Income Solution is a series of websites which claim to offer the recipient an easy and fast way to make inordinately large sums of money while allegedly "working from home." The site is promoted solely via large-scale, high-volume non-compliant spamming using thousands of sites which resemble television news websites but which are fake. It has also been known as eHome Cash Flow Solution

Basic SummaryEdit

This site's entire goal is to get you to send someone $97 USD in return for a package for which they make the dubious claim that consumers will start making thousands of dollars per week.

Sample SpamEdit

Most of the spam messages are extremely basic and usually feature a link which abuses one or another URL-shortening service like bit.ly.

Subject: FW: Work At Home Mom Makes $8,876/Month Part-Time

http://bit.ly/esEVOG
Subject: (no subject)

http://wacemevy.t35.com/MelisaLee.html
Invset in whta yuo cxan do

False ClaimsEdit

As with all other spammed websites, this one has a boatload of false pretense all over it.

The spammed site attempts to convince the spam recipient that they are on a news site, typically a local or regional American TV website.

At the top of the page on each of these sites is the call-out "Advertorial", making it appear that a genuine TV station has sanctioned this "story" for the purposes of advertising.

Advertorials do exist on real news websites, and they typically appear as regular stories, but they do have to identify themselves as an advertorial so that consumers do not confuse the item with an actual news story.

They register domains that attempt to support the claim that they're a genuine TV station:

biz101news.com
biz102news.com
biz103news.com
biz104news.com
biz105news.com
...
biz5flash.ru
biz6flash.ru
biz7flash.ru
biz8flash.ru
biz9flash.ru
biz10flash.ru
...
bizdev1news.com
bizdev2news.com
bizdev3news.com
bizdev4news.com
bizdev5news.com
bizdev6news.com
...
new1flashreport.com
new2flashreport.com
new3flashreport.com
new4flashreport.com
new5flashreport.com
new6flashreport.com
...
new1reports.ru
new2reports.ru
new3reports.ru
new4reports.ru
new5reports.ru
...
news1dailyflash.com
news2dailyflash.com
news3dailyflash.com
news9flash.com
news200flash.com
news201flash.com
news202flash.com

etc.

These sites used to actually use the names of genuine news websites like CNN, CNBC an MSNBC. They switched to the more recent regional / local version in around February 2011.

(Note the use of Russian (.ru) top-level domains. To anyone's knowledge, a local or regional American news channel would have absolutely no requirement for a website registered or hosted in Russia.)

The difference here is that the site solely exists to show this so-called "advertorial" page, and nothing on the page links back to any actual news content or any other content describing the so-called TV station, its location, who works there, etc.

The first indication that this is not a genuine news site is that they offer no genuine channel number or station identification letters anywhere on the site. They merely refer to themselves vaguely as "News Reports 8" or "News Channel 8 - On Your Side". They don't indicate in what city or state this "station" is supposedly located. Channel 8 where? In what city?

But look even slightly closer and the second indication reveals itself.

Here are examples of the top of the page for three of these fake "News" sites:

Newschannel8 header

Header #1 for a Home Cash Flow Solution fake news site.

Newsreports8 header

Header example #2 for a Home Cash Flow Solution fake news site.

Consumerwarningsweekly header

Header example #3 for a Home Cash Flow Solution fake news site.

Note that they feature the same headline, the same general type of header, the same icons, the same navigation, and even the same people (Jacqueline Douglas and Ralph Stevens) whom they claim to be their news correspondents. Their correspondents' names appear identically on each site, but do not link to any further story because there are no investigative entries anywhere on these sites.

The images of the alleged "correspondents" are, as expected, stock photos:

Stockphoto1 This image is from Getty Images.

Stockphoto5 This image is from iStockPhoto.

Stockphoto7 This image is also from iStockPhoto.

Very clearly: these are not real news sites, and this is not an advertorial.

Homecashflowsolution targetsite

The main website for Home Cash Flow Solution

The main target site these spamvertised domains actually link to also makes more breathless claims. It states that you could "earn $200 to $1000+ in revenue every day working as little as 30 minutes", that it was voted #1 by both "Online Entrepreneur Magazine" and "Work From Home Oppritunity Online" [sic]. Neither are genuine.

The right-side column features what they claim are testimonials but each testimonial also feature stock photos, not photos of any genuine person who might have given a testimonial.

* Click here to see Ryan Masters' at iStockPhoto
* Click here to see The Casey's at iStockPhoto
* Click here to see William McDonald at Getty Images
* Click here to see Mr. & Mrs. Fleming at iStockPhoto

(source)




The site has a lot of copy describing that they will set up 10 websites for you. They don't state what those websites do, or specifically how any money is generated by them, but they show a chart depicting hundreds of dollars being generated per day without ever stating what these sites actually sell.

Their "Refund Policy" page states the following:

Double Power Guarantee #1:

If you try my program and you're not seeing the results you
had hoped for, I don't want your money and I'll promptly
give back every penny to you – no questions asked!

Double Power Guarantee #2:

Even better, if you've put my system into action for 8 weeks
without seeing stunning results, I welcome you to take me up
on my “Money Back Guarantee!”

However there is clear evidence that the most anyone has ever been refunded was 10% of what they paid, and that was only after a lot of time spent arguing on the phone.

Candice says:
February 13, 2011 at 4:09 pm
I purchased The Home Cash Flow System in desperate attemp to
seek additional income. It says there is a one time fee of
$97 and a 60day money back guarantee but let me tell you
that when i called to make good on the money back guarantee
the said they could only refund me for 10%.When I asked them
to explain this to me they seemed a little stunned and
hesitated on their reply. They said the only gave full
refunds if you upgraded to their VIP. I was quick to ask
them what the point of cancelling this so called lifetime
opportunity if I couldn't even get my full refund that was
promised and they told me to not incure any futher charges.
Well as you could have guessed I questioned them on their
one time fee of $97 which I had already paid for. The
customer support guy quickly got irritated with me
questioning them on their practices and started rambling on,
which made no sense to me.

At the very least, this whole setup is misleading, but at the worst, they're certainly lying at nearly every step of the consumer's journey through their site.

False security claimEdit

HomeCashFlowSolutionSSL

Fake secure encryption claim, click to enlarge


The payment page asks for your identity and credit card information. It is normal business practice to do this on a web form that encrypts the information using a "Secure Sockets Layer" (SSL). You can see if it is secure by looking at the address in the browser's address bar. If it starts with https then you know it is secure, but if it starts with http you know it is not. Home Cash Flow Solution shows http, so we know it is not secure, but the scammers have put up images of padlocks and false claims to be using 256-bit encryption. These criminals are unscrupulous.

No Opt-outEdit

This set of sites have a history of not honoring any request to stop receiving spam, and in fact the spam promoting these scammy websites only increases if anyone attempts to opt out.

Their contact page lists the following contact information:

If you have a question about our products or services please contact our
expert support team at: support@ehomecashflowsolution.com

If email just doesn't cut it and you need more advanced help, please call our
toll-free customer support hotline at:
US Toll Free: 1-877-663-5057
USA/Canada: 1-877-778-8350
UK: 0-800-014-8175
Australia: 1-800-757-069

We want to see your satisfaction and success.  My team and I can be reached anytime
Monday-Friday, between the hours of 9am-8pm EST.

Email sent to their support address is always met with a boilerplate response:

-- do not edit --

(Recipient's name),

A customer support staff member has replied to your support request, #664922 with
the following response:

Your email - (receipient's@email.address) - has been added to our unsubscribe list,   
please allow up to 15 business days for it to take effect. I assure you this issue
will be corrected in the near future. Sorry for the inconvenience!

Thanks,
Customer Support

We hope this response has sufficiently answered your questions.

The spam does not stop. This email is therefore considered to be a lie.

There are few resources available to the unsuspecting consumer who sends this company any money. They have at least one story of a failure to refund specifically as they describe on their own website, so one should be prepared for a lengthy series of discussions regarding refunds. They don't honor any opt-out request yet they lie when they say they remove you from their lists. This generally indicates that this entire setup is not to be trusted.

As extra ammunition, the Home Cash Flow Solution has been given an "F" rating by the Better Business Bureau.

Sponsoring registrarsEdit

The domain names that allow this scam to survive are registered with specific registrars. To protect themselves from a charge of aiding and abetting crime, these registrars have a Terms of Service agreement allowing them to terminate the service contract for domains that are used for unlawful purposes. The domains listed above have been registered with these providers:

  • NAUNET-REG-RIPN
  • CENTER OF UKRAINIAN INTERNET NAMES
  • CHINA SPRINGBOARD INC

Sponsoring ISPsEdit

The domains listed above run on web servers, and we can determine where these are located from from their IP addresses. There are several addresses -

  1. 95.64.59.5
  2. 95.64.59.12
  3. 95.64.59.222
  4. 95.64.59.223
  5. 95.64.59.249
  6. 95.64.59.250

These addresses are all located in Romania and have the following Internet Service Provider contact details on record

Matei Roman
Uneltcom SRL
Str. Septimius Serverus 26B
Alba Iulia, Jud. Alba
+40752665986
Sanyi.Kelemen1@gmail.com
abuse e-mail: noc@xwebhosting.ro

How to Report this SpamEdit

Complainterator generates requests to the registrars of any spammed domains to remove these sites and their name servers. You should specifically mention that this program has a history of fraud. Add a link to this page for evidence,

http://www.spamtrackers.eu/wiki/index.php/Home_Cash_Flow_Solution

Further ResearchEdit

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